Future of the Universe Theme Prevalent in July Planetarium Schedule at UW

During July, the University of Wyoming Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium programs will emphasize the future of the universe, including possible colonization of other planets and future space exploration.

“Aliens and exoplanets, colonizing a planet beyond the solar system and the potential fate of the cosmos: July at the UW Planetarium takes a look into the future of our universe and the many marvels we are hoping to discover in the cosmos,” says Samantha Ogden, the planetarium’s coordinator.

Kid-themed planetarium shows are Saturdays at 11 a.m. The month also includes five Tuesday night shows; they begin at 7 p.m.

Tickets cost $3 for students and $4 for non-students, and can be purchased at the Department of Physics and Astronomy main office, located in Room 204 of the Physical Sciences Building, Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m.-noon. Tickets also can be purchased by going online at www.uwyo.edu/physics/ and clicking on “Planetarium Schedule.” Doors open 20 minutes before each show, where tickets will be sold if available. The planetarium, which seats 58, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Building.

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The July planetarium schedule is as follows:

— “This Month’s Sky,” Tuesday, July 3, 7 p.m. This program looks at constellations, meteor showers and visible planets. The summer solstice also will be discussed.

— “Creating an Intergalactic Empire,” Friday, July 6, 8 p.m. This program explores the reality of human colonization on other planets. The STAR Observatory on the rooftop of the Physical Sciences Building will be open to the public 8-10 p.m. Weather permitting, telescopes will be set up to peer into the evening sky.

— Full-dome movie, “Distant Worlds — Alien Life?,” Tuesday, July 10, 7 p.m. This film takes viewers on a journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop, starting with life on Earth and moving out to the rest of our solar system and on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.

— “Monsters of the Cosmos,” Friday, July 13, 8 p.m. In the grand scheme of the universe, each human is but a speck of dust floating in the cosmic winds. This program looks into the various ways our speck of dust could end, from the energy of a gamma ray burst or hypernova, to reality itself ceasing to exist.

— “The Earth’s Companion,” Saturday, July 14, 11 a.m. This program explores the moon, Earth’s constant companion. Visitors are welcome to stay after the program to model craters and eclipses.

— Full-dome movie, “Distant Worlds — Alien Life?,” Tuesday, July 17, 7 p.m. This film takes viewers on a journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop, starting with life on Earth and moving out to the rest of our solar system and on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.

— “The Great Giants and Their Children,” Friday, July 20, 8 p.m. This program looks at the outer planets of our solar system, known as “gas giants” due to their tremendous size. Their pull of gravity is so strong that many moons are trapped in orbit around these planets. The STAR Observatory on the rooftop of the Physical Sciences Building will be open to the public 8-10 p.m. Weather permitting, telescopes will be set up to peer into the evening sky.

— Full-dome movie, “Distant Worlds — Alien Life?,” Tuesday, July 24, 7 p.m. This film takes viewers on a journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop, starting with life on Earth and moving out to the rest of our solar system and on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.

— “Futurology,” Friday, July 27, 8 p.m. This program takes a realistic look into the future of space exploration, and visitors can discover the most important scientific instruments ever built.

— “A Home Beyond Home,” Saturday, July 28, 11 a.m. This program takes viewers on a journey to the stars to see if there is a new planet that can be called home. Visitors can stay after the program to design an exoplanet.

— Full-dome movie, “Distant Worlds — Alien Life?,” Tuesday, July 31, 7 p.m. This film takes viewers on a journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop, starting with life on Earth and moving out to the rest of our solar system and on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.

For more detailed descriptions of these programs, go to www.wyomingspacegrant.org/planetarium/shows/.

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