Gordon signs bills to extend medical assistance and advanced property tax

0
271

 

Wyo4News Staff, [email protected] [PRESS RELEASE]

CHEYENNE, WYOMING — Fulfilling a priority outlined in his State of the State address, Governor Mark Gordon signed a bill to extend medical assistance to low-income mothers and children for 12 months after birth, and a joint resolution that allows Wyomingites to vote on a Constitutional amendment that is a first step in delivering residential property tax reform for Wyoming residents. This came on the final day of the Legislature’s 2023 General Session. 

 

In an emotional public signing ceremony attended by legislators from both chambers and advocates for the bill, Governor Gordon described House Bill 4 – Medicaid twelve-month postpartum coverage as a “signature piece of pro-life legislation”. The bill extends postpartum Medicaid coverage from 90 days to 12 months and is expected to help between 1,000 and 2,000 low-income Wyoming mothers.

“We heard in the mental health summit we hosted last fall about the importance of getting mothers and children off to a good start. Taking care of both in that critical first year of development pays dividends down the road,” Governor Gordon said. “I couldn’t be more pleased to sign a bill that does just that at the close of the session.”

 

Governor Gordon also signed Senate Joint Resolution 3 – Property tax residential property class. The joint resolution will place an amendment before Wyoming voters that would create a separate class for residential real property, allowing for the Legislature to reduce residential property tax assessments. The Governor described it as an opportunity to put the state on a path for long-term property tax relief for families. 

In his closing remarks to both the Senate and House chambers, the Governor thanked the members for their service and for their work on a budget that puts more than $1 billion into savings. He also urged the members of the Legislature to continue seeking “Wyoming solutions to Wyoming problems,” in the interim instead of bringing forward legislation developed in Washington, DC by think tanks and lobbyists.