Wandering Amylessly: Discovering roots at a Farm to Flask event

0
233

October 16, 2022

By Amy Larsen
Wyo4News feature writer

Wanderingly Amylessly while being grounded.

I have been grounded lately. After six months of nonstop travel, I have spent the last three weeks at home, and in many ways, it brings me back to my teenage years. Housework that needs to be caught up projects that need to be completed before winter, and even the realization of how disconnected I have become from my friends and community has started to set in. In many ways, it has felt like learning how to readapt to a familiar routine.

It feels weird that I can have food in my fridge that can stay there for a few days, and the milk hasn’t gone bad yet. 😊 Heck, even my dogs are back to their bad habits. So life has a feeling of normalcy, although I find myself getting antsy, even a little bored.

Advertisement 

The other day, as I was catching up on Netflix shows, something got me reflecting on the idea of establishing roots and being grounded somewhere. Nature has taught us that strong roots are essential for growing what nourishes us. Nature teaches us the opposite of a rolling stone gathers no moss. Growth cannot take place in constant motion. Clearly, I have rarely had to check for moss, but I did have to pause and wonder if I am establishing solid roots anywhere if I am not grounded.

One thing about being antsy is that it made me pay attention to things that were happening around me, and I came across an advertisement for an event Visit Cheyenne was putting on out at the Pine Bluffs Distillery. The event is called October West Fall Harvest Dinner. Really two big things stuck out to me about this event. First, it was at the Pine Bluffs Distillery, a lace I hadn’t visited since it opened five years ago, and second. It was a grain-to-glass and farm-to-table event. Wyoming is a state that prides itself on agriculture. All in all, it seemed like a great adventure that I did not want to miss.

Submitted photo by Amy Larsen

The evening started with a cocktail reception where the drinks were created from the distilleries’ alcohol or malt, which was locally grown. The distillery oversees their entire process, from grain to glass, farm to flask, which is remarkable. You can tell they are incredibly proud of not just their product but what they are doing for the local community and region as well.

Next up was dinner, which had beer-braised bison. Don’t try saying that too many times after a few cocktails! They also offered roasted pork or a vegetarian option. I didn’t really pay attention to either.

The meal was held in one of the barrel rooms and lit by twinkling lights and lanterns, the perfect fall environment. After a delicious homemade dessert, we were able to go into a different barrel room and sample a Rye Whiskey right from the barrel and learn more about their process. While the room was technically filled with spirits, the spirits of the attendees equally matched them with definite proof of a successful event.

The event had a limited number of tickets available, and outside of some friends that agreed to go with me, I knew only a few attendees at the event. However, I quickly discovered that it didn’t matter who you knew before, as the smaller event led to conversations with whoever you happened to be next to. Conversation and laughter flowed even faster than the cocktails, and there was just something comforting about it, almost familiar. It really was a home-grown event, with an emphasis on home.

Submitted photo by Amy Larsen

As I was driving home, I realized that roots don’t necessarily have to be buried in one place to nourish you and help you grow. Instead, they travel with you and can get nutrients from the places you go and the people you meet. They help you grow and develop into the unique grain that you are and, in turn, help you create your spirit. If grown and distilled correctly, those spirits help raise the spirits of others. It’s a beautiful process.

I also realized that it is home and all that comes with it. Home really keeps you grounded. It’s the friends, family, and others that you surround yourself with that remind you of who you are, where you are from, and what is important. It is a place you can always come back to and people to return to. I am thankful I have been grounded for a while.

Advertisement 

Advertisement 

Advertisement 

Advertisement 

Advertisement